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20 April 2013

Germ Warfare

The danger posed by bacteria becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics has been brought to the attention of the G8 nations by the UK’s Chief Medical Officer, Dame Sally Davies. She warns that even routine operations could become risky within 20 years if the world fails to develop a new generation of antibiotics. One potential source is the human body, which makes natural germ-killing substances known as antimicrobial peptides. About 1,700 of these peptides have been detected including dermcidin, produced in sweat to disinfect cuts and grazes. Dermcidin kills bacteria by making holes in their surface – a strategy that is difficult for bugs to evolve defences against. Scientists recently studied how these holes are formed and the computer simulation pictured shows peptide molecules in orange and dark blue, forming a channel into the cell. This hole allows ions to flow uncontrollably across the cell membrane, with fatal results.

Written by Mick Warwicker

UC San Diego Professor Awarded Bloomberg Manulife Prize for Promotion of Active Health

ucsdhealthsciences:

A $50,000 research prize to promote active health has been awarded to James Sallis, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.  Sallis is a noted academic who is on a mission to use research to promote health, fitness, and active lifestyles.

The 2012 Bloomberg Manulife Prize for the Promotion of Active Health – the world’s largest prize devoted to physical activity – is awarded annually by McGill University in Montreal, Canada, in association with Lawrence S. Bloomberg and Manulife Financial.  The prize is given to a researcher “whose work promises to broaden our understanding of how physical activity, nutrition or psychosocial factors influence personal health and well-being.”  Sallis will accept the award at special ceremonies in Toronto on January 21, 2013 and on January 23 on the McGill campus in Montreal.

Widely regarded as a leading expert in the field of policy and environmental influences on fitness, nutrition and obesity, Sallis has dedicated his career to health promotion through physical activity, and has been recognized with numerous honors and awards, including a Distinguished Service Award from the Society of Behavioral Medicine, the Vice Presidency of the American College of Sports Medicine, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition.

He is an outspoken advocate of evidence-based interventions, and to that end has led many large-scale research projects, including the Neighborhood Quality of Life Study, a study of neighborhood walkability and physical activity, which is the model for studies conducted around the world. He is also co-founder of SPARK (Sports, Play, and Active Recreation for Kids), which resulted in the development and implementation of highly effective physical activity programs for youth across North America.

Sallis is also the director of the Active Living Research Program, which aims to build the evidence base about how environments and policies shape physical activity, and subsequently use the evidence to inform policy change.

UC San Diego Professor Awarded Bloomberg Manulife Prize for Promotion of Active Health

ucsdhealthsciences:

A $50,000 research prize to promote active health has been awarded to James Sallis, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.  Sallis is a noted academic who is on a mission to use research to promote health, fitness, and active lifestyles.

The 2012 Bloomberg Manulife Prize for the Promotion of Active Health – the world’s largest prize devoted to physical activity – is awarded annually by McGill University in Montreal, Canada, in association with Lawrence S. Bloomberg and Manulife Financial.  The prize is given to a researcher “whose work promises to broaden our understanding of how physical activity, nutrition or psychosocial factors influence personal health and well-being.”  Sallis will accept the award at special ceremonies in Toronto on January 21, 2013 and on January 23 on the McGill campus in Montreal.

Widely regarded as a leading expert in the field of policy and environmental influences on fitness, nutrition and obesity, Sallis has dedicated his career to health promotion through physical activity, and has been recognized with numerous honors and awards, including a Distinguished Service Award from the Society of Behavioral Medicine, the Vice Presidency of the American College of Sports Medicine, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition.

He is an outspoken advocate of evidence-based interventions, and to that end has led many large-scale research projects, including the Neighborhood Quality of Life Study, a study of neighborhood walkability and physical activity, which is the model for studies conducted around the world. He is also co-founder of SPARK (Sports, Play, and Active Recreation for Kids), which resulted in the development and implementation of highly effective physical activity programs for youth across North America.

Sallis is also the director of the Active Living Research Program, which aims to build the evidence base about how environments and policies shape physical activity, and subsequently use the evidence to inform policy change.

UC San Diego Health Sciences News: Prenatal Depression: coping with anxiety, hopelessness, and fear while pregnant

ucsdhealthsciences:

While the phenomenon of postpartum depression has received increased attention and research over the last decade, less is known about prenatal depression – the sense of hopelessness, fear and anxiety that can afflict women during their pregnancy.

The condition isn’t uncommon – it occurs in…

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